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If you or a loved one is in the market for a home that will meet a physical or developmental need, there are some tips to consider before you begin the process. The US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) website lists state, local government, and other organizations that can help you. At the federal level, the agency also provides information about HUD’s Section 504 regulations that define federal financial assistance, in particular, Section 811 outlines its program for Supportive Housing for Persons with Disabilities. It is important to research what assistance is available before contacting a realtor.

Once you have a strategy in place to utilize available programs to minimize costs, it is time to think about the housing location. Is the special needs individual employed or a student? Can they drive a car or do they need to be near public transportation to get to work or school? If the individual is a K-12 student, pay particular attention to school and after-school programs. Research what is available as many schools have programs for children with special needs that are offered outside of the standard school zoning in some neighborhoods. Also, take into account the proximity of hospitals and doctors. Consider the location of shopping (food and otherwise), dining and entertainment. Be sure to note whether there are any restrictions regarding support animals (if relevant to you or your loved one).

Once the location list is narrowed down talk to others who have faced the same housing challenges; whether it is a support group, school parent message boards, housing assistance advocacy group, or online forum you can save a lot of time and money by learning from others who have gone before you. In these discussions ask a lot of follow up questions. Dialing into the details can help save you missteps in your process.

Once you have identified a general location that meets some of the criteria above, it is time to canvas the availability of appropriate homes. When thinking about the layout and design of a home, consider the rambler or ranch style house. They have a long low profile, very few stairs to navigate (if any) and have minimal exterior and interior decoration. These rambler attributes make the home reasonably easy to modify.

If mobility is an issue, look for a house with smooth floorings such as hardwood floors or laminate flooring. Smooth surfaces provide easier access to shower and bathroom areas. Also, check to see that the doorways in the home are wide enough to accommodate a wheelchair. Assess how many modifications would be required to address your or your loved one’s needs while remaining within a budget. Grab bars, ramps, and other similar amenities are reasonably simple to add, and some states, cities, and counties will help pay for the modifications.

Not only are there federal, state and local agencies to help you meet the requirements of a special needs home, there are also lenders and realtors who specialize in financing and purchasing this type of home. A good lender and realty agent will be familiar with the agencies and government programs that can help their client get approved for a loan and maneuver the housing marketplace for the right fit.

Realtor.com, Zillow, Homesnap, and Redfin are just a few of the online options to explore real estate from your home or mobile device. Just plug in an address of a home in the area that meets your criteria and you will get stats on that home as well as an aerial map of the neighborhood that allows you to click on and get information about homes that are not currently on the market but may be soon.

Realize this process takes time. Identify a strong, competent real estate agent who understands your special needs parameters and is willing to put forth the time to find the right housing solution for you. Also, speak with a trusted attorney to ensure you have maximized all potential program benefits available to you. Buying a home is probably the biggest purchase you will make in your life. Buying a home that accommodates special needs adds a layer of complexity that should be well thought out before hiring a realtor.

If you have questions or would like to discuss your particular situation, please don’t hesitate to reach out.

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To comply with the U.S. Treasury regulations, we must inform you that (i) any U.S. federal tax advice contained in this newsletter was not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, by any person for the purpose of avoiding U.S. federal tax penalties that may be imposed on such person and (ii) each taxpayer should seek advice from their tax advisor based on the taxpayer’s particular circumstances.

Nothing in this message is intended to provide legal advice.  This message is for educational purposes only.

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